Tomac Winery, Anfora, and the Wine Guys – in Pictures

Last week, two editors from Wine Enthusiast magazine, Mike DeSimone and Jeff Jenssen (aka the World Wine Guys), visited Croatia to receive the Golden Pen Award from the Croatian National Tourism Board for their article called “Croatia – In Living Color”, which was published in the September 2011 issue of Wine Enthusiast.

After receiving the Golden Pen Award (“Zlatna Penkala”), the Wine Guys toured a selection of wineries, vineyards, hotels, and restaurants in the continental region of Croatia.

The Wine Guys were escorted by Cliff Rames, sommelier and founder of Wines of Croatia, who along the way captured a few snapshots of their journey. We will be sharing an assortment of Cliff’s photos with you over the next few weeks, starting with this collection of shots from Tomac winery in the Plešivica wine-growing hills – a cool, hilly region about 30 minutes west of Croatia’s capital city, Zagreb.

Tomac is best known for his sparkling wines and iconic Anfora wines. You can read more about Tomac HERE.

(All photos ©2012 Cliff Rames)

Welcomed to Tomac winery by the roses.
Tomislav Tomac

The House of Anfora
Buried anfora
Sparkling rose on a spring day – perfect!
Fine “perlage”
A riesling of great potential.
Tomac “Classic” 2006 sparkling (70% Chardonnay; 30% field blend)
Anfora 2009 Riesling

Wine Guys with Zvonimir and Tomislav Tomac
Nothing like good wine talk & debates!
The Gang: Cliff Rames; Jeff Jenssen; Tomislav Tomac; Mike DeSimone; Zvonimir Tomac
Plešivice vineyards

Valentine’s Day with the Donkey, the Poet and the Saint

By Cliff Rames © 2012

Indisputably the color of Valentine’s Day is red. Red hearts. Red roses. Red candy. Red velvet. Red blushing of the cheeks when one is happily asked by a secret admirer or sweetheart to “be my Valentine”.

Often the wine of the day is red too. Malbec, pinot noir, Rioja, Barolo, merlot and cabs are perennial favorites among mainstream consumers. While some of those wines may be fine choices, if you’re looking to impress your sweetheart with your creativity and red wine savvy, why not go with something a bit more adventurous and unique – like plavac mali from Croatia. 🙂

Exceptions to the February 14th red wine rule exist, of course. Last week Wine Spectator magazine published an article entitled “Oysters, Caviar and Sauvignon Blanc for Valentine’s Day” – a tempting and sexy suggestion that is bound to excite and convince some red wine drinkers to break with tradition and cross over to the white side.

Valentine’s Day is also a time when there is much chatter – and debate and disagreement – about wine and chocolate pairing. Is it a match made in heaven? The answer – especially in regard to dry wines – is probably not. Very sweet foods will make dry wine taste astringent and bitter. Wines with some residual sugar sweetness may succeed, but it’s hit or miss. To paraphrase a famous quote from Forrest Gump, when it comes to wine and chocolate pairing, “you never know what you’re gonna get”.  😉

But in case you’re really curious, we already did some of the matchmaking work for you – with mixed results – in an earlier post, Wine & Chocolate: Can Bura Dingac Find True Love This Valentine’s Day? Check it out and let us know if you have had luck with other wine and chocolate combinations. If you still remain a skeptic about the merits of the pairing, you have an ally in Remy Charest, whose excellent article called About That Wine and Chocolate Thing is quite educational and compelling.  

By far the most intriguing argument in favor of red wine at Valentine’s Day stems from a widely-circulated article in Wine Enthusiast Magazine called “Women and Wine: Red-Rules”. The article cites a study from the University of Florence (Italy) in which it was discovered that moderate consumption of red wine seems to increase a woman’s libido: “Women who consumed one to two glasses of wine a day reported an enhanced sexual appetite and improved sexual performance… researchers from the University of Florence study believe certain chemical compounds in red wine increased (sic) blood flow to one’s erogenous areas, ultimately causing an influx of sexual stimulation.”

Very interesting, indeed!  🙂

So – if you are now convinced that red wine is the way to go on Valentine’s Day, below you’ll find three Croatian red wine suggestions – all made from the indigenous plavac mali grape – to help tickle your fancy this Valentine’s Day. We’ve nicknamed them “the Donkey”, “the Poet” and “the Saint”, for reasons you’ll soon discover.

(photo by Cliff Rames)

Your choice of which wine to serve will depend on your mood, expectations and needs. If you want to release your inner animal and really romp, go for the playful power of the Donkey. If a more romantic, nuanced and sensitive approach is appropriate, let the Poet serenade and seduce you. If the evening demands a little divine intervention or magic touch, call upon the Saint.

Whatever your choice, each of these wines is delicious in its own right, full of character, charm, and mystique. All three wines are bursting with sexy, sun-drenched flavors of Croatia’s Dalmatian coast – where there just happens to be a heart-shaped island. You certainly can’t get hotter than that for Valentine’s Day!

1. “The Donkey”: Vinarija Dingac 2006 Dingač. This is the original, timeless Croatian classic with the donkey mascot on the label. It’s packed with savory fruit and earth aromas of dried fig and plum, brambly blackberries and cherry, licorice, rusted iron and iodine mineral notes, and a touch of leather. Funky yet friendly, this premium wine from the local cooperative on the Pelješac peninsula was aged in large, old wooden vats and has a touch of residual sugar that helps offset the dry, dusty tannins and gives roundness to the slightly baked fruit flavors. At 14% alcohol, it’s big but not overly powerful and shows a beautiful translucent garnet color. Enjoy with steak with black truffle butter and grilled portabella mushrooms or seafood risotto. And yes, there is enough viscosity and sweetness in the wine to hold up to a mild dessert. It works particularly well with the beloved hazelnut nougat chocolate from Croatia called Bajadera.  🙂

(photo by Cliff Rames)

2. “The Poet”: Miloš 2006 Plavac. Proprietor and winemaker Frano Miloš is known to recite his poetry for lucky visitors to his winery in Ston on the southern-most shores of the Pelješac peninsula. And like the man, his wines are sublime and slow to open. But when they do, they speak candidly and romantically of the place from which they came and of the struggle to remain kind and gentle in such a harsh, rustic and unforgiving landscape. “In hues the colors pour through the glass, reflecting shades in motion. In their layers they speak, narrate, whisper of a time of hardship” writes Frano. The 2006 Miloš Plavac delivers “garnet color with a salmon edge. Nose of red roses, autumn floor, mushrooms, and earth give way to red fruits and well rounded tannins. Frano oversees a simple vinification with natural yeasts, and 12 months in neutral Slavonian oak followed by 24 months bottle aging before release” (tasting notes by Blue Danube Wine Company).

(By the way: That earlier reference to oysters and Sauvignon Blanc? The good news is that Plavac Mali seems to be one of the rare red wines that can successfully pair with oysters. Read about it here and decide for yourself: Shucking Plavac.)

3. “The Saint”: Saints Hills 2008 Dingač, St. Lucia vineyard. The latest heir to the cult wine throne in Croatia, its prestige further fueled by famous wine consultant Michel Rolland’s involvement with the winery. This single-vineyard wine is made from plavac mali grapes grown on the steep, sun-drenched, seaside slopes of Croatia’s most-prized vineyard appellation: Dingač. Fermented in large wooden vats and aged for 15 months in French oak barrels, this full-bodied wine is rich with sun-baked black fruits, roasted herbs, dried fig, licorice and spice. Powerful (15.5% ABV) yet soft and elegant, this wine would do well to accompany braised beef short ribs, roast lamb, wood fire-grilled meats and fish, aged hard cheeses – and even dark bittersweet chocolate.  🙂

(photo by Cliff Rames)

Croatia Scores with Feature Story in Wine Enthusiast Magazine

 

For the first-time ever, Croatia finds itself featured in a prominent mainstream U.S. wine magazine.

Wine Enthusiast, one of the leading wine journals in the English language, published three articles in the September 2011 print and online issues, all dedicated to Croatia and its wines, food culture, and appeal as a travel destination.

The September issue, which pronounces Croatia as “An Historic Wine Lovers Paradise” on the cover page, also includes reviews of 16 Croatian wines, as well as hotel, restaurant and winery recommendations by region.

Encompassing seven full-color pages (in the print edition), the lead story by Wine Enthusiast Contributing Editors, Lifestyle & Entertaining, Mike Desimone and Jeff Jenssen (AKA: World Wine Guys) is entitled “Croatia – In Living Color”.

In the article the Wine Guys detail their “journey from north to south along the Adriatic coast”, which they describe as an “underexplored jewel by the sea” that “offers rich history, splendid scenery and epicurean delights—starting in Istria, and then down the Dalmatian Coast, with its 1,000 islands”.

The online version of the magazine offers two additional articles. The first is written by Desimone and Jenssen and is called “Exploring Croatia”.

The article provides detailed hotel, restaurant and winery recommendations based on Desimone’s and Jenssen’s experience while traveling in Croatia in October 2010, when they spent a week visiting Croatia’s capital city, Zagreb, as well as Istria and Dalmatia on the coast – regions they described as “a wine and food lover’s paradise”.

The online version of Wine Enthusiast contains a third article by Kristin Vuković with the mouth-watering title, “Consuming Croatia” highlighting some of the “gastronomical delights” one can experience in Croatia. Inside you’ll find two scrumptious recipes, one for Palačinke (Croatian crêpes) and one for Grilled Mediterranean Branzino with Blitva (Sea Bass with Chard).

Kristin’s yummy recipes are matched with wine pairing suggestions by Certified Sommelier and founder of Wines of Croatia, Cliff Rames.

Wine Enthusiast is a wine magazine, so let us not forget the best part: the wines! The September issue contains scores for 16 Croatian wines in its Buying Guide, including labels from Agrolaguna, Belje, BIBICh, Dingač Winery, Grgić, Iločki Podrumi, Istravino, Korta Katarina, Matošević, and Piližota. All wines were reviewed by Wine Enthusiast Tasting Coordinator, Anna Lee Iijima.

Six of the best-scoring wines are highlighted in the magazine under the headline, “Top Wines of Croatia”. Most notably, two wines were awarded 90-points: Grgić Vina 2009 Pošip and Korta Katarina 2006 Plavac Mali.

 

If you can, we strongly recommend that you pick-up a copy of the September issue and read all about it. Or check it out online (links embedded above). May we also suggest that when you open this historic issue of Wine Enthusiast, you raise your favorite glass of Croatian wine. It is certainly a time to celebrate!

They say that every journey begins with a single step. The publication of these three articles may have been one small step for Wine Enthusiast magazine, but it was a giant leap for the Croatian wine industry.

From this new height the stars on which so many dreams are planted today seem a little closer. To reach them will require much more hard work, a smart and effective marketing strategy, and new investment in people, ideas, tools and material. Beyond the star that is Wine Enthusiast magazine lie many more stars, solar systems and galaxies. Collectively they form the heavens.

Do we have what it takes to get there?

One additional note: We applaud Korta Katarina Winery for having the foresight and business savvy (and resources) to recognize an opportunity. The winery invested some serious cash to purchase a full-page color advertisement in the September issue for its 2010 Rosé. Readers of the magazine – who may feel compelled to seek out a Croatian wine or two – will in the preceding pages notice a very juicy ad for an excellent Croatian Rosé – one that just happens to be available in the U.S. and other export markets.

With that, Korta Katarina became the first Croatian winery to advertise in a mainstream American wine magazine. The bar has been raised; let us strive to leap higher still!

(photos by Cliff Rames)